BEING TOUCHY

too many hands

Health Care professionals all seem to be taught this “technique” to make people feel “more comfortable:”

Touch your patient

I don’t know who the Neanderthal is that came up with this caca idea, but I can guarantee that people like me aren’t amused.

PLEASE–DON’T TOUCH ME WITHOUT MY CONSENT!

“Why,” you might ask, “is she so touchy about being touched?”

My body has been around long enough so that if you touch me in just the right way it feels like an electric shock.  I’m not debating the reasons why it’s that way.  I don’t care if it’s all in my head or I’m 3 brain cells away from dementia or if I’m coming down with some sort of mysterious late-onset autism.  I am saying that if you touch me without my consent–without giving me the chance to brace for it first, it is a harmful and offensive contact.  

NEWS FLASH!  

BATTERY is a physical act that results in harmful or offensive contact. 

Yesterday at the dental school, I was touched no less than 5 times by people I’ve never met before while sitting in a chair wearing a blindfold (which I need to block out the light).  Yes, I expect dental work to hurt–especially the shot for the local anesthetic.  But think of it this way:

My dental student and most dentists know to say,

” Open your mouth” 

BEFORE trying to stick a drill into it.

Have I asked people not to touch me if I’m not expecting it?  When I don’t have a dental dam in my mouth.

Have they respected my request?  Some do.  Others seem to think that their mission in life is to desensitize me.

Trying to desensitize someone who doesn’t want to be touched is like trying to rid a person of a peanut allergy by forcing them to eat peanuts.  

So, for all health professionals out there who have been told that people just LOVE to be touched by strangers without being asked first:

DO NOT TOUCH ME TO “MAKE ME FEEL COMFORTABLE.”

IT DOES JUST THE OPPOSITE.

IF YOU TOUCH ME AND I TELL YOU TO STOP  AND YOU KEEP TOUCHING ME,

THAT’S CALLED BATTERY 

PLEASE NOTE THIS IN MY CHART UNDER “ALLERGIES.” 

Is that clear enough?